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Newt Gingrich Thinks I’m A Slut

“Contraception, when it first became available, was a revolution in this country.  It allowed women to enter employment and educational opportunities that had previously not been accessible because they were unable to control their reproduction in the same way.  And I just can’t imagine rolling back the clock on that progress,” – Sandra Fluke

“There is no compelling government interest in making contraception an “essential benefit” of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act – certainly not at the expense of religious liberty.” – Ben Boychuk

‘I’d rather health insurance cover birth control for the young than cover Viagra for old men’ – Vox Populi

I am the proud mommy of a 6-year-old boy and a happily married wife to an incredible man.  We plan to add another little one to our mix, just not yet.  I’ve been on birth control since the age of 16 when I was prescribed it to help with severe cramping and headaches, along with other symptoms that were less than pleasant.  As my parent’s insurance didn’t cover the cost, I paid $39 out of my tiny paycheck every four weeks for a new pack.  During my freshman year of college, insurance began to pick it up and I had 6 blissful months where my birth control was free of charge.  Unfortunately, that was short-lived and the company decided to cover only half of the cost, leaving me to pay around $20 for a 4 week supply.  When I learned that a generic version was available, cost dropped by half but insurance also stopped paying.  At this point in time, I pay about $480 a year to keep myself child-free until the day my husband and I decide we’re ready for it.

It’s painfully obvious that the cost of birth control is far lower than the cost of treating a pregnant woman to term or even to an unfortunate miscarriage.  It’s less costly than adding a baby to the insurance policy.  There is enough debate and figures out there already to support this, so I won’t focus too much on it.  I do want to point out, however, the ridiculousness of covering drugs that will improve one’s sex life and encourage reproduction, certain surgeries that will improve appearance and therefore make one more attractive and likely to have intercourse, yet not be concerned with covering the things that will prevent unwanted pregnancies that come as a result.

A while back there was a proposed law to declare a fetus a human life and therefore make abortion illegal, as it would be the murder of this life.  Abortion has always been a hot button issue with people both on the pro-life and the pro-choice side.  It would seem like a no-brainer to me to encourage insurance companies to fully pay for birth control for women, as this would reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies and in turn, reduce the number of women who seek abortions.  One would think that this would be a go-to topic for the pro-life crowd to focus their energy on; if their goal is to abolish abortion, work to abolish unwanted pregnancies by making birth control readily available for every single person who requires it.

I’ve heard families like the Duggars say that they are leaving the number of children they have up to God.  Some religious people believe that whether or not they conceive is in God’s hands and they must not use birth control, as it’s not part of His plan.  If you believe in God, shouldn’t you also believe that He put doctors and medicines in place in order to help you?  How can God sanction hospital births but not sanction the use of birth control devices prescribed by the same doctors that are trusted in bringing babies into this world?  I had an unplanned pregnancy during a time I still had faith and I didn’t believe for one second that God decided a newly single woman working night shift at IHOP and living in a crappy room for rent was the right person to give a baby to.  If you believe in God’s plan, that’s fine, but you also need to have some common sense and realize that accidents happen.  God’s plan doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take precautions in life.  You wouldn’t fail to buckle your seatbelt and ignore stop signs because God decides when it’s your time to die, not carmakers, laws and government road signs.

I don’t want to start a debate on the intelligence our government shows when it comes to responsible spending, but it’s safe to say that they have made a bit of a mess of things and don’t always act responsibly.  A federally funded program is allowing California teens to receive free condoms and have them delivered to their door, so obviously it’s somewhat of a priority for the government to promote safe sex and prevent pregnancies.  But what about people like myself in a monogamous relationship who isn’t ready just yet for a child, doesn’t wish to use condoms with her spouse, and who doesn’t want her husband to get a vasectomy or get her own tubes tied when we feel our family is complete?  What about women who use condoms, understand they are hardly fool-proof, and wish to have an extra level of protection?  What about women who were where I was as a teen and have severe symptoms that can be alleviated with the use of birth control pills?  Where do we fit in?

I would love to see government funding go into either making birth control pills (and certain other methods) completely free of charge or at least reduce it to $5 or less a pack and base the cost on a person’s income and/or whether or not the pills are name brand or generic.  It should be as easy to get birth control as it is to get laid.  Sex isn’t going to come to a halt, the abortion debate will never be settled, child abuse won’t vanish, and babies will keep popping out of people who don’t want them.  The cost of raising a child isn’t going to go down, promiscuous people aren’t going to wake up tomorrow and change their ways, and people in general aren’t going to stop having sex.  I don’t want birth control to be out of my reach or the reach of anyone else who needs it.  To make it so is terribly irresponsible and completely unacceptable.

A lot of folk who share my point of view raise the argument that a man shouldn’t be proposing any ways to control what a woman does with her body.  I agree with this 100% but I also don’t really give a damn if it’s a man or a woman telling me I can’t have my birth control.  Yes, you can govern certain things I do with my body, such as using it as a deadly weapon or using it to incite a riot or disturb the peace.  No, you are not allowed to govern how I choose to decorate my body (earrings, hair color, tattoos, etc.) nor are you allowed to govern how I care for it and what I choose to use it for.  Making birth control inaccessible to some is just as bad as making it mandatory; you’re sticking your hands where they do not belong.

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About Jamie C. Baker

“Long time no see. I only pray the caliber of your questions has improved.” - Kevin Smith

Posted on March 4, 2012, in Kids, Life, News and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

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